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41 Fun Children's Books About Fruit

Looking for a list of the best children's books about fruit?

As parents, we all want our kids to grow up healthy and strong. Teaching them a little about nutrition, such as the importance of eating their fruits and vegetables, is a great way to help. We’ve gathered all of our favorite books about fruit that will catch your child’s interest and make their mouth water!

For those who are looking to inspire even the littlest readers to be fruit lovers, we’ve found the juiciest board books. Toddlers up to adult ages will enjoy these funky, fruity picture books, and we’ve even found great chapter books for those middle-grade readers who could use a boost of fruit in their diet. These fruit-filled stories will not disappoint.

Don’t want to discriminate against those veggies? Check out the fruit and vegetable story books we’ve included, like “Eating the Alphabet” and “Edible Numbers.” We also have an entire book list focused on books filled with vegetable characters, varieties, and facts!

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Mrs. Peanuckle's Fruit Alphabet
Written by Mrs. Peanuckle & illustrated by Jessie Ford
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

Mrs. Peanuckle’s Fruit Alphabet introduces babies and toddlers to the colorful foods that will help them grow up to be healthy and strong. Children and parents alike will want to devour the fun facts and charming illustrations of fruits from the familiar banana to the not as familiar yumberry.

Mrs. Peanuckle’s Fruit Alphabet is the second in a series of board books celebrating the joy nature brings to young children at home and in the backyard, from fresh fruits and vegetables to birds, bugs, flowers, and trees.

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The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear
Written & illustrated by Audrey Wood and Don Wood
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-6

First published in 1984, a picture book in which the Little Mouse will do all he can to save his strawberry from the Big, Hungry Bear, even if it means sharing it with the reader. The Little Mouse and the Big Hungry Bear are known and loved by millions of children around the world. Little Mouse loves strawberries, but so does the bear…How will Little Mouse stop the bear from eating his freshly picked, red, ripe strawberry.

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The Very Hungry Caterpillar
Written & illustrated by Eric Carle
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

Follows the progress of a hungry little caterpillar as he eats his way through a varied and very large quantity of food until, full at last, he forms a cocoon around himself and goes to sleep. Die-cut pages illustrate what the caterpillar ate on successive days.

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The Watermelon Seed
Written & illustrated by Greg Pizzoli
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

With perfect comic pacing, Greg Pizzoli introduces us to one funny crocodile who has one big fear: swallowing a watermelon seed. What will he do when his greatest fear is realized? Will vines sprout out his ears? Will his skin turn pink? This crocodile has a wild imagination that kids will love. With bold color and beautiful sense of design, Greg Pizzoli’s picture book debut takes this familiar childhood worry and gives us a true gem in the vein of I Want My Hat Back and Not a Box.

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Blueberries for Sal
Written & illustrated by Robert McCloskey
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

What happens when Sal and her mother meet a mother bear and her cub? A beloved classic is born!

Kuplink, kuplank, kuplunk! Sal and her mother a picking blueberries to can for the winter. But when Sal wanders to the other side of Blueberry Hill, she discovers a mama bear preparing for her own long winter. Meanwhile Sal’s mother is being followed by a small bear with a big appetite for berries! Will each mother go home with the right little one?

With its expressive line drawings and charming story, Blueberries for Sal has won readers’ hearts since its first publication in 1948.

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  • That Fruit Is Mine! - When five fruit-loving elephants spot a scrumptious hard-to-reach fruit high up in a tree, it’s a race to see who can claim it first! But after one too many fumbles, the elephants begin to lose their cool, and the highly coveted fruit is whisked away by the teeny-tiniest of all jungle creatures—mice! The elephants soon realize they have a lot to learn from this cooperative little bunch.

  • We're Going to the Farmers' Market - In this story, readers get to visit local farmers, fill baskets with fresh fruits and vegetables, and then head home to cook a feast, all with goodies from the farmers’ market! Featuring Stefan Page’s graphic art, this delightful board book is filled with bold splashes of color and unique patterns.

  • Counting to Bananas - A hilarious, mostly-rhyming picture book about a banana and narrator who can’t quite agree on what their book is about. Perfect for fans of Mo Willems’ We Are in a Book and Adam Rex’s Nothing Rhymes With Orange!Mo Willems fans will give this book one, two, three, four, five stars! –ParentsTillotson’s rib-tickling debut is not to be missed!–Kirkus When a narrator starts filling this story with fruit, Banana can’t wait to step into the spotlight. The book is called Counting to Bananas, after all. But as more and more fruits (and non-fruits) are added to the story, Banana objects. When will it be time for bananas?! With laugh-out-loud text from debut author Carrie Tillotson and brought to life by illustrator Estrela Lourenço this is the story of a banana and narrator who have very strong opinions about what should (and should not!) be in this book. The perfect next read for fans of Jory John and Pete Oswald’s The Bad Seed series! Praise for Counting to Bananas In the tradition of Mac Barnett’s Count the Monkeys, Tillotson’s rib-tickling debut is not to be missed . . . Lourenço’s digitally created illustrations of cartoon fruit with faces and expressive animals are bright, dynamic, and foolish. Fruity fun for everyone. –Kirkus

  • Orange for Frankie - Patricia Polacco’s most poignant Christmas tale! The Stowell family is abuzz with holiday excitement, and Frankie, the youngest boy, is the most excited of all. But there’s a cloud over the joyous season: Tomorrow is Christmas Eve, and Pa hasn’t returned yet from his trip to Lansing. He promised to bring back the oranges for the mantelpiece. Every year there are nine of them nestled among the evergreens, one for each of the children. But this year, heavy snows might mean no oranges . . . and, worse, no Pa! This is a holiday story close to Patricia Polacco’s heart. Frankie was her grandmother’s youngest brother, and every year she and her family remember this tale of a little boy who learned–and taught–an important lesson about giving, one Christmas long ago

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Orange Pear Apple Bear
Written & illustrated by Emily Gravett
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-4

Destined to become a contemporary classic, this book has spare text and sweet illustrations but contains only five words: apple, pear, orange, bear–and there. Emily Gravett creates clever variations on this theme by rearranging the words–on one spread, a brown bear juggles an orange, apple, and pear; on another spread, there is an orange-colored apple and a pear-shaped bear. Simple and compelling, children will enjoy reading this book over and over again as they learn many different concepts.

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Dog Food
Written & illustrated by Joost Elffers and Saxton Freymann
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-8

For dog lovers of all ages, a banquet of (pepper) puppy puns!

Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers have wowed readers with the funny food faces of HOW ARE YOU PEELING, the underwater vegetable visions of ONE LONELY SEAHORSE and the lush produce landscapes of GUS AND BUTTON. Now with DOG FOOD, the duo turns its talents to the canine realm, wittily reworking familiar doggy phrases for a whole new level of humor and meaning. These pepper pooches and mango mutts are guaranteed to charm dog owners, dog lovers, and even – dare we say it – cat fans. Chow down!

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Ten Apples Up on Top!
Written by Theo LeSieg and Dr. Seuss & illustrated by Roy McKie
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-7

Three friends balance counting and fun in this silly Beginner Book by Dr. Seuss and illustrated by Roy McKie. When a lion, a dog, and a tiger meet up, they soon discover that they can each do different things while balancing apples on their heads. Whether drinking milk, jumping rope, or roller-skating, they can do a lot with ten apples up on top! But watch out, she has a mop! She’ll knock those apples from up on top. Seuss’s apple-balancing characters will have youngsters reading, counting, and giggling!

Originally created by Dr. Seuss, Beginner Books encourage children to read all by themselves, with simple words and illustrations that give clues to their meaning.

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A Fruit Is a Suitcase for Seeds
Written by Jean Richards & illustrated by Anca Hariton
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-9

“Many seeds travel inside fruits. The fruit is like a suitcase for the seeds. It protects them on their trip.” Readers will learn how fruits are designed to protect a plant’s seeds and also to help the plant spread its seeds to new places.

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Avocado Asks
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

A deliciously funny book about identity and being confident in your own skin–featuring the world’s most popular superfood, the avocado! Avocado is feeling just fine in the produce section at the supermarket until a young customer asks a difficult question: Is an avocado a fruit or a vegetable? Avocado doesn’t know the answer either, and the question won’t seem to go away! Soon, avocado is in the midst of a full-on identity crisis. Children will laugh along as Avocado hunts for answers in each aisle of the grocery store, chatting with fish, cans of beans, sausages, and finally a tomato, who confides to Avocado that he doesn’t know what HE is either, adding And. I. Don’t. Care. With cool, vivid artwork and a funny twist on every page, here is a story that celebrates individuality and fluidity, letting children know they are perfect just as they are and however they choose to express themselves.

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  • James and the Giant Peach - From the bestselling author of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and The BFG! After James Henry Trotter’s parents are tragically eaten by a rhinoceros, he goes to live with his two horrible aunts, Spiker and Sponge. Life there is no fun, until James accidentally drops some magic crystals by the old peach tree and strange things start to happen. The peach at the top of the tree begins to grow, and before long it’s as big as a house. Inside, James meets a bunch of oversized friends—Grasshopper, Centipede, Ladybug, and more. With a snip of the stem, the peach starts rolling away, and the great adventure begins!

  • Fruits in Suits - Have you ever seen a banana in a bikini? Or a tangerine in trunks? What about grapes in goggles? In this uproarious follow-up to Vegetables in Underwear, kids will learn that there are many kinds of suits–including suits for swimming, surfing, sunbathing, and scuba diving. But can you wear a business suit to the beach? Fruits in Suitshas the same irreverent silliness as Vegetables in Underwearand shows just how much fun swimsuits can be–and how important it is to hold on to them when you jump into the water!

  • Kitchen Disco - At night when you are sleeping There’s a party in your house, It’s a pumping, jumping, funky bash When all the lights go out . . . When the sun goes down, the Kitchen Disco starts up - and all the fruit in the fruit bowl come out to play! There are lemons who break-dance, tangerines who twirl and some very over-excited apples! Parents will love reading this funky, rhyming picture book to their kids which is sure to get the whole family dancing! This is a fun and fresh picture book that kids and adults will both love. A great way to get kids moving and also excited about fruit! There is an accompanying YouTube Kitchen Disco video - perfect for dancing and singing along.

  • Ned's New Home - When Ned’s apple begins to rot, he must search for a new house. A pear isn’t quite right. A watermelon isn’t perfect either. A pile of blueberries? All wrong! Will any other fruit make Ned feel at home again? Little ones will love this happy story about finding the perfect place to call home.

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Strawberry Girl
Written by Lois Lenski
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 6-10

The land was theirs, but so were its hardships Strawberries – big, ripe, and juicy. Ten-year-old Birdie Boyer can hardly wait to start picking them. But her family has just moved to the Florida backwoods, and they haven′t even begun their planting. “;Don′t count your biddies ′fore they′re hatched, gal young un!”; her father tells her. Making the new farm prosper is not easy. There is heat to suffer through, and droughts, and cold snaps. And, perhaps most worrisome of all for the Boyers, there are rowdy neighbors, just itching to start a feud.

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The Cherry Thief
Written & illustrated by Renata Galindo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Chef Armand’s cakes are famous for the delicious red cherries that adorn each one. But when the cherries start disappearing, he sets a trap to catch the thief, with unexpected results! What will he do with the culprit, and is there a long-term solution that will make everyone happy? A charming debut picture book filled with very visual humour.

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Edible Numbers: Count, Learn, Eat
Written & illustrated by Jennifer Vogel Bass
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

Juicy apples! Plump, ripe pears! Twisted mushrooms! Counting your way through the farmer’s market has never been so much fun. Discover a world filled with exciting fruits and vegetables in this bright, bold follow-up to Edible Colors. This simple concept counting book will leave your mouth watering as you count from one to twelve with a kaleidoscope of tasty produce. Readers will learn about counting, variety, and color through the detailed, crisp photographs of homegrown and farmer’s market fruits and vegetables!

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Little Apple Goat
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

Little Apple Goat is ordinary in every way – except for one. Instead of munching on oats or grass or laundry left on the line, she prefers to eat fruit from the orchard.But one stormy night, all of the fruit trees in the orchard are destroyed. The trunks are chopped down and the land is cleared. The farm animals cannot imagine life without the orchard, and Little Apple Goat doesn’t know how she will manage without her fruit.But time passes, and something mysterious begins to happen on the farm . . . Sweet, colorful illustrations bring to life this clever tale that will charm young readers and also introduce them to the changing seasons.

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One Day and One Amazing Morning on Orange Street
Written by Joanne Rocklin
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-11

When a mysterious man arrives one day on Orange Street, the children who live on the block try to find out who he is and why he’s there. Little do they know that his story–and the story of a very old orange tree–connects to each of their personal worries in ways they never could have imagined. From impressing friends to dealing with an expanding family to understanding a younger sibling’s illness, the characters’ story lines come together around that orange tree.
Taking place over the course of a day and a half, Joanne Rocklin’s masterful novel deftly builds a story about family, community, and the importance of connection. In the end the fate of the tree (and of the kids who care for it) reminds us of the magic of the everyday and of the rich history all around us.

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  • Edible Colors: See, Learn, Eat - “A unique and eye-catching concepts board book featuring brightly colored varieties of fruits and vegetables that’s perfect for teaching little ones to identify colors (and good foods to eat).” - Seira Wilson, Amazon Editor With a combination of unusual foods and a kaleidoscope of colors, this concept book shows that not all foods have to look the same way. A banana can be red, broccoli can be purple, and cherries can be yellow and still taste just as delicious.

  • Eating the Alphabet - A popular alphabet storybook is presented in a sturdy, easy-to-hold board-book edition for the youngest readers and highlights vivid collage illustrations of colorful apples, blueberries, carrots, yams, and zucchini.

  • Fruit Bowl - Who belongs in the fruit bowl? Apples, check. Blueberries, check. Tomato, che— Wait, what?! Tomato wants to join the other fruits, but does he belong? The perfect mix of botany and a bunch of bananas! All the fruit are in the bowl. There’s Apple and Orange. Strawberry and Peach. Plum and Pear. And, of course, Tomato. Now wait just a minute! Tomatoes aren’t fruit! Or are they? Using sly science (and some wisdom from a wise old raisin), Tomato proves all the fruit wrong and shows that he belongs in the bowl just as much as the next blueberry! And he’s bringing some unexpected friends too!

  • The Last Peach - Gus Gordon’s The Last Peach is the story of two indecisive bugs contemplating eating the last peach of the summer in a hilarious picture book about anticipation and expectation. Summer’s almost over, and there’s one peach left. There’s also one big question in the air: Should someone eat it? What if it’s rotten inside? But what if it’s juicy? Should the bug who saw it first get to eat it? Should both bugs share it with their friends? Will anyone eat the peach?! EVER?!? Find out in this charming, juicy tale by acclaimed picture book artist Gus Gordon.

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Princesses Save the World
Written by Savannah Guthrie and Allison Oppenheim & illustrated by Eva Byrne
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

Princess Penelope Pineapple and her fellow princesses from the Fruit Nations are on a mission to rescue the Strawberry Kingdom’s food from certain ruin, and surprisingly Penny’s beloved bees are the key to saving the realm’s produce.

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Bad Apple: A Tale of Friendship
Written & illustrated by Edward Hemingway
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

It takes a firm apple to stand up to bullies.

When Mac, an apple, meets Will, a worm, they become fast friends, teaching each other games and even finishing each other’s sentences. But apples aren’t supposed to like worms, and Mac gets called “rotten” and “bad apple.” At first, Mac doesn’t know what to do–it’s never easy standing up to bullies–but after a lonely day without Will, Mac decides he’d rather be a bad apple with Will than a sad apple without.

Edward Hemingway’s warm art and simple, crisp text are the perfect pairing, and themes of bullying and friendship are sure to hit readers’ sweet spots all year round.

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Foods with Moods: A First Book of Feelings
board book
Recommend Ages: 0-3

How are you peeling today? Happy? Silly? Excited? Worried? Whatever you’re feeling, there’s a food that shares your mood, and these delightful, delectable sculptures are sure to turn a frown upside-down.Saxton Freymann and Joost Elffers have wowed readers with the funny food faces of How Are You Peeling?: Foods with Moods, the underwater vegetable visions of One Lonely Seahorse, the lush produce landscapes of Gus and Button, and the punny puppies of Dog Food.Almost 20 years after the original hardcover edition of the first in the collection, How Are You Peeling?: Foods with Moods, the vivacious veggies return in this brand-new board book adaptation, Foods with Moods: A First Book of Feelings.

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Pick, Pull, Snap!: Where Once a Flower Bloomed
Written by Lola M. Schaefer & illustrated by Lindsay Barrett George
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

In the orchard a honey bee buzzes. Its legs brush pollen inside a fragrant pink flower: A small green fruit begins to grow and grow and grow…. Peaches and peas and even peanuts – they all begin with a single flower: How? Open this book and find out!

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The Fruits of Your Labor
Written & illustrated by Andrew Tobin
board book
Recommend Ages: 1-18

The Fruits of Your Labor is a board book that explores the size progression of a baby in the womb in relation to a fruit or vegetable. Beginning at the size of a sweet pea and growing to the size of watermelon, each week of pregnancy is documented as a watercolor painting next to a fun, and also true fact about that specific fruit or vegetable, mixed with a playful quip. With its endearing illustrations and droll humor, The Fruits of Your Labor makes a perfect gift for both new babies and expectant mothers.

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  • Sweet Neighbors Come in All Colors - An ensemble of friendly fruit characters sing about their diversity of colors, shapes, and sizes. This title gives children the opportunity to explore early-learning concepts and offers families the chance to discuss ideas like unity and diversity. Includes sheet music and online link to the song’s recording.

  • Belinda Brown - David McKee has created a new modern classic with the story of Belinda, a banana-obsessed young girl. Her whole family thinks it’s a phase, except for Grandma Brown: she worries, and worry is hard to keep down. She asks Belinda to give up her favourite fruit before she gets a banana-shaped body, but Belinda has other ideas.

  • Cooking with the Lorax - The Lorax–Dr. Seuss’s beloved icon of environmentalism–takes kids from the garden to the kitchen in this rhymed easy reader perfect for showing beginning readers where our food comes from! In this super simple rhymed story, the Lorax picks fresh fruit and vegetables from his garden and prepares himself a delicious, healthy salad for lunch. An ideal choice for children learning to read, foodies, gardeners, and of course, Dr. Seuss fans, it’s perfect for showing young children how the plants we eat grow from the Earth (and NOT in supermarkets)! Step 1 Readers feature big type and easy words for children who know the alphabet and are eager to begin reading. Rhyme and rhythmic text paired with picture clues help children decode the story.

  • How Does My Fruit Grow? - Sophie loves visiting her aunt and uncle in the countryside and learning all about the fruits that grow in their garden: strawberries, redcurrants and cranberries. She even discovers how a tall cherry tree grows from a small seed, and how bees help blossoms become fruit. She is sad when her family moves south but starts to enjoy her new garden with its different plants and trees. Soon Sophie makes friends with her neighbours who help her harvest melons, grapes, figs, oranges and pomegranates. At school, Sophie and her classmates learn about tropical fruits and nuts from all over the world – bananas, coconuts, cashews, pineapples and many more. This superb companion to Gerda Muller’s beloved How Does My Garden Grow? is full of beautiful, and fascinatingly detailed, illustrations. The simple story, both informative and entertaining, is perfect for teaching children where food comes from, and for inspiring interest in the wonderful diversity of the world around us.

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A is for Apricat
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-5

Learn the ABCs through cute, quirky mash-ups of animals and food, from Apricat to Zebrussels Sprout!A is for Apricat is a fun, creative way for kids to learn their ABCs. Combining photos of fresh fruits and vegetables with cute illustrations of animals, illustrator Mauro Gatti has created a whole new kind of critter! The Apricat has the round, fuzzy body of a real apricot, with the adorable whiskers and face of a kitten. And the Turkale may have the head and neck of a turkey, but its body is fresh and green. Each page features a letter with a new fruit or vegetable creature, paired with simple text to help kids learn the letter, the animal, and the food. A food facts page at the back explains the health benefits of each featured food with playful, kid-geared language.Promoting healthy eating and imaginative thinking, this unique, lighthearted take on a basic concept will be enjoyed by kids and parents alike. The Little Concepts series helps young readers learn their ABCs with adorable illustrations featuring unique animals, colors, languages, and healthy foods. From A to Z, learning the alphabet (even in Spanish and French!) has never been so surprising and engaging.

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What's for Lunch?
Written by Eric Carle
board book
Recommend Ages: 3-6

As toddlers pull a cardboard monkey on a string through die-cut holes, they learn the numbers one through ten and the names of ten fruits in an interactive book by the author of The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

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I Am Bat
Written & illustrated by Morag Hood
board book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

I am bat. I love cherries. They are juicy and red and delicious and… My cherries! Some of them are missing. Who took my cherries? Was it YOU?

Join the grumpily adorable Bat as he searches for his missing cherries in this vibrant and hilarious picture book

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Very Hungry Wolf
Written by Agnese Baruzzi
board book
Recommend Ages: 2-4

Fans of Agnese Baruzzi’s imaginative board books will “gobble up” this lively book about a wolf whose eyes and appetite are bigger than his stomach. In this hilarious lift-the-flap board book, a HUNGRY wolf is ready to devour whatever animal crosses his path, with a quick “chomp, chomp!” But when he gobbles up one creature who’s a little more challenging than he imagines, the wolf may have to rethink his diet altogether. Children will love lifting the flaps of this book to find out who’s on the menu, and what happens when one hungry wolf meets his match.

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Nothing Rhymes with Orange
Written & illustrated by Adam Rex
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-6

A perfect laugh-out-loud, read-aloud from New York Times bestselling author Adam Rex!

We all know nothing rhymes with orange, but how does that make Orange feel? Well, left out, obviously!

When a fruit parade gets together to sing a song about how wonderful they are—and the song happens to rhyme—Orange can’t help but feel like it’s impossible to ever fit in. But when one particularly intuitive Apple notices how Orange is feeling, the entire English language begins to become a bit more inclusive.

Beloved author-illustrator Adam Rex has created a hilarious yet poignant parable about feeling left out, celebrating difference, and the irrefutable fact that nothing rhymes with orange.

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