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Moving: Books For Kids

Looking for a list of the best children's books about moving?

Moving can come with all sorts of different emotions: sadness, excitement, fear, anxiety, and more. One sure way to provide some comfort and reassurance, while providing a safe place to talk about feelings, is by reading together. To help you and your little readers through a move, we’ve gathered the best books on the subject of moving to be a comfort and help.

As E.B. White said, “A library is a good place to go when you feel unhappy, for there, in a book, you may find encouragement and comfort. A library is a good place to go when you feel bewildered or undecided, for there, in a book, you may have your question answered. Books are good company, in sad times and happy times, for books are people - people who have managed to stay alive by hiding between the covers of a book.”

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The Terrible Two
Written by Mac Barnett and Jory John & illustrated by Kevin Cornell
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

The Terrible Two (Terrible Two Series #1) by Mac Barnett and Jory John, Kevin Cornell

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Glitter Gets Everywhere
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

This debut novel is a poignant exploration of grief, change, and hope, perfect for fans of Lisa Graff and Lindsey Stoddard. After Kitty’s mother dies on an inappropriately sunny Tuesday, all Kitty wants is for her life to go back to “normal”–whatever that will mean without her mum. Instead, her dad announces that he, Kitty, and her sister are moving from their home in London to New York City, and Kitty will need to say goodbye to the places and people that help keep her mother’s memory alive. New York is every bit as big and bustling as Kitty’s heard, and as she adjusts to life there and befriends a blue-haired boy, she starts to wonder if her memories of her mum don’t need to stay in one place–if there’s a way for them to be with Kitty every day, everywhere.

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Violets Are Blue
Written by Barbara Dee
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-13

From the author of the acclaimed My Life in the Fish Tank and Maybe He Just Likes You comes a moving and relatable middle grade novel about secrets, family, and the power of forgiveness. Twelve-year-old Wren loves makeup–special effect makeup, to be exact. When she is experimenting with new looks, Wren can create a different version of herself. A girl who isn’t in a sort-of-best friendship with someone who seems like she hates her. A girl whose parents aren’t divorced and doesn’t have to learn to like her new stepmom. So, when Wren and her mom move to a new town for a fresh start, she is cautiously optimistic. And things seem to fall into place when Wren meets potential friends and gets selected as the makeup artist for her school’s upcoming production of Wicked. Only, Wren’s mom isn’t doing so well. She’s taking a lot of naps, starts snapping at Wren for no reason, and always seems to be sick. And what’s worse, Wren keeps getting hints that things aren’t going well at her new job at the hospital, where her mom is a nurse. And after an opening night disaster leads to a heartbreaking discovery, Wren realizes that her mother has a serious problem–a problem that can’t be wiped away or covered up. After all the progress she’s made, can Wren start over again with her devastating new normal? And will she ever be able to heal the broken trust with her mom?

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The Best Family Ever
Written by Karen Kingsbury
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Much-loved storyteller Karen Kingsbury’s Baxter Family books have captured the hearts of millions who have come to think of the Baxter family as their own. Now Karen Kingsbury and her son Tyler Russell tell the childhood stories of the beloved Baxter children—Brooke, Kari, Ashley, Erin, and Luke—to inspire and entertain younger readers.

Brooke is the perfect older sister. For that reason, Kari and Ashley work hard to make their parents just as proud of them as they are of Brooke. Each girl has her own talents. Brooke is an excellent student. Kari is a great soccer player. Ashley, a talented artist. And they are always there for each other. But when the news comes that Dr. Baxter is moving the family from Ann Arbor to Bloomington, Indiana, and the Baxters need to leave the only home and friends they’ve ever known, no one is happy. Saying goodbye is hard but the family still has what’s most important—their faith and their love for each other.

The first book in the Baxter Family Children series, #1 New York Times bestselling author Karen Kingsbury and Tyler Russell tell the story of what it was like to grow up in the Baxter family, the best family ever.

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Evelyn del Rey Is Moving Away
Written by Meg Medina & illustrated by Sonia Sanchez
picture book
Recommend Ages: 5-7

From Newbery Medalist Meg Medina comes the bittersweet story of two girls who will always be each other’s número uno, even though one is moving away. A big truck with its mouth wide open is parked at the curb, ready to gobble up Evelyn’s mirror with the stickers around the edge . . . and the sofa that we bounce on to get to the moon. Evelyn Del Rey is Daniela’s best friend. They do everything together and even live in twin apartments across the street from each other: Daniela with her mami and hamster, and Evelyn with her mami, papi, and cat. But not after today–not after Evelyn moves away. Until then, the girls play amid the moving boxes until it’s time to say goodbye, making promises to keep in touch, because they know that their friendship will always be special. The tenderness of Meg Medina’s beautifully written story about friendship and change is balanced by Sonia Sánchez’s colorful and vibrant depictions of the girls’ urban neighborhood.

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  • Insignificant Events in the Life of a Cactus - Aven Green was born without arms–so when her dad takes a job running a dying western theme park in Arizona, she knows she’ll become the center of unwanted attention at her new school. But she bonds with Connor, a classmate with his own disability to conquer. Then they discover a room at the park that holds bigger secrets than Aven ever could have imagined. Can Aven face her fears, solve a mystery, and help her friend, too?

  • I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings - A phenomenal #1 bestseller that has appeared on the “New York Times” bestseller list for nearly three years, this memoir traces Maya Angelou’s childhood in a small, rural community during the 1930s. Filled with images and recollections that point to the dignity and courage of black men and women, Angelou paints a sometimes disquieting, but always affecting picture of the people–and the times–that touched her life.

  • Forget Me Not - A girl tries to hide her quirks at a new school in this middle-grade novel from debut author Ellie Terry. Astronomy-loving Calliope June has Tourette syndrome, so she sometimes makes faces or noises that she doesn’t mean to make. When she and her mother move yet again, she tries to hide her TS. But it isn’t long before the kids at her new school realize she’s different. Only Calliope’s neighbor, who is also the popular student body president, sees her as she truly is–an interesting person and a good friend. But is he brave enough to take their friendship public? As Calliope navigates school, she must also face her mother’s new relationship and the fact that they might be moving–again–just as she starts to make friends and finally accept her differences. Partially in verse and partially in prose with two intertwined points of view, Ellie Terry’s affecting debut will speak to a wide audience about being true to oneself.Praise for Forget Me Not “Terry’s debut novel thoughtfully traces the fragile emotions of two seventh graders: Calliope, a girl painfully self-conscious about having Tourette syndrome, and Jinsong, a popular boy she meets in her new town. Terry, who has Tourette syndrome herself, offers enormous insight into an often-misunderstood condition, writing in verse for Calliope’s chapters and prose for Jinsong’s. Her poetic explorations of Calliope’s anxiety and Jinsong’s moral struggles are honest and moving.” –Publishers Weekly”Terry, who herself lives with Tourette’s syndrome, movingly draws from her own experience as she describes Callie’s experiences and behaviors. The narrative alternates between Callie’s and Jin’s perspectives, with Callie’s chapters in affecting, varied poems and Jin’s in plain prose and e-mails. This heartfelt, multivoice story with a meaningful message about friendship and acceptance is perfect for kids who appreciate realistic, character driven stories, such as Rebecca Stead’s Goodbye Stranger (2015).” –Booklist”Written in a patchwork of prose poetry and free verse, Terry’s narrative deftly represents the reality of TS in its fullness. It works to deconstruct common misconceptions, such as that those who have TS have a propensity to swear, and sheds light on the raw confusion and the frightening nature of a physical experience that is utterly unpredictable . . . This exploration of Calli’s neurological disorder and her struggle to find her place will stay in the hearts and minds of readers for a long time….” –School Library Journal”Terry’s debut novel is a rare treat–a beautiful story of middle grade friendship, crushes, accepting differences, and how to deal with the school bullies. Terry’s use of figurative language and symbolism is magical. It will offer lessons in tolerance, acceptance, and kindness toward those different than themselves.” –School Library Connection

  • Snow Lion - A beautiful, reassuring story with a gentle touch of magicAfter moving to a new home, Caro wishes she had a friend, but she’s too shy to meet the neighborhood kids. With a little imagination, however, Caro finds the Snow Lion. Together, they have all kinds of fun racing, climbing, and playing hide-and-seek. But when the boy next door asks Caro to come play, Caro isn’t so sure. Then, the Snow Lion has an idea! Making new friends isn’t always easy, but it is always worth it in the end.This powerful but gentle story about making new friends is gorgeously illustrated to celebrate the magic and imagination that fills every page and will appeal to any shy or lonely young reader.

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Arrival
Written by Chris Morphew
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 12-17

Luke is having a rough year. When his parents split up, his mum drags him to Phoenix, a brand-new town in the middle of nowhere. Then he discovers that someone is plotting to wipe out the human race. Phoenix is suddenly the safest and most dangerous place on earth. One hundred days remain until the end of the world …

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Me Talk Pretty One Day
Written by David Sedaris
chapter book
Recommend Ages: -

David Sedaris’ move to Paris from New York inspired these hilarious pieces, including the title essay, about his attempts to learn French from a sadistic teacher who declares that every day spent with you is like having a caesarean section. His family is another inspiration. You Can’t Kill the Rooster is a portrait of his brother, who talks incessant hip-hop slang to his bewildered father. And no one hones a finer fury in response to such modern annoyances as restaurant meals presented in ludicrous towers of food and cashiers with six-inch fingernails.

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Yard Sale
Written by Eve Bunting & illustrated by Lauren Castillo
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

“While the topic of moving is covered in a multitude of picture books, this one looks at it from a difficult perspective that most authors choose to avoid or gloss over.” – School Library Journal (starred review) Almost everything Callie’s family owns is in their front yard – their furniture, their potted flowers, even Callie’s bike. They can’t stay in this house and are moving to a smaller apartment where most of their things won’t fit, so today they are having a yard sale. With sensitivity and grace, Eve Bunting and Lauren Castillo portray an event at once familiar and difficult, making clear that a home isn’t about what you have, but whom you hold close.

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Home Is a Window
Written by Stephanie Ledyard
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

A family learns what home really means, as they leave one beloved residence and make a new home in another. A Notable Social Studies Trade Book for Young People Home can be many things–a window, a doorway, a rug . . . or a hug. At home, everything always feels the same: comfortable and safe. But sometimes things change, and a home must be left behind. Follow a family as they move out of their beloved, familiar house and learn that they can bring everything they love about their old home to the new one, because they still have each other. This heartfelt picture book by Stephanie Parsley Ledyard is richly illustrated by former Pixar animator Chris Sasaki. A BookPage Best Book of the YearA Bank Street Best Book of the Year

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Liar & Spy
Written & illustrated by Rebecca Stead
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

Seventh-grader Georges adjusts to moving from a house to an apartment, his father’s efforts to start a new business, his mother’s extra shifts as a nurse, being picked on at school, and Safer, a boy who wants his help spying on another resident of their building.

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  • The House on Mango Street - Here is Sandra Cisnero’s greatly admired and best-selling novel of a young girl growing up in the Latino section of Chicago. Acclaimed by critics, beloved by children and their parents and grandparents, taught everywhere from inner-city grade schools to universities across the country, and translated all over the world, “The House on Mango Street” has entered the canon of coming-of-age classics even as it depicts a new American landscape. Sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes deeply joyous, “The House on Mango Street” tells the story of Esperanza Cordero, whose neighborhood is one of harsh realities and harsh beauty. Esperanza doesn’t want to belong - not to her run-down neighborhood, and not to the low expectations the world has for her. Esperanza’s story is that of a young girl coming into her power, and inventing for herself what she will become. “The San Francisco Chronicle” has called “The House on Mango Street” “marvelous… spare yet luminous. The subtle power of Cisnero’s storytelling is evident. She communicates all the rapture and rage of growing up in a modern world.” It is an extraordinary achievement that will live on for years to come.

  • Fresh Princess - Based on The Fresh Prince created by Will Smith, Destiny is the Fresh Princess. Meet Destiny—a cool, energetic, and strong-willed young girl who approaches every day with her own signature style! That is, until she moves to a brand-new neighborhood, where nothing looks quite the same as it did at her old house. Even with new challenges and new friends to make, Destiny always has a plan. With a few reminders from her loving family and after remembering what being the Fresh Princess is all about, she may just take the leap and jump right in! Written by celebrated author, blogger, and editor Denene Millner and illustrated by Gladys Jose, Fresh Princess is the perfect book to encourage kids to proudly stand out and be themselves!

  • Big Ernie's New Home: A Story for Children Who Are Moving - Affirms the normal sadness, anger, and anxiety that young children feel after a move. This work discusses the feelings that young children face when moving and offers suggestions for smoothing their adjustment.

  • Goodbye, Friend! Hello, Friend! - From the creator of The Rabbit Listened comes a gentle story about the difficulty of change . . . and the wonder that new beginnings can bring. Change and transitions are hard, but Goodbye, Friend! Hello, Friend! demonstrates how, when one experience ends, it opens the door for another to begin. It follows two best friends as they say goodbye to snowmen, and hello to stomping in puddles. They say goodbye to long walks, butterflies, and the sun…and hello to long evening talks, fireflies, and the stars. But the hardest goodbye of all comes when one of the friends has to move away. Feeling alone isn’t easy, and sometimes new beginnings take time. But even the hardest days come to an end, and you never know what tomorrow will bring.

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Last Meeting of the Gorilla Club
Written by Sara Nickerson
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

A moving new middle grade novel about childhood anxiety and grief, from the author of The Secrets of Blueberries, Brothers, Moose, and Me. Eleven-year-old Josh Duncan has never had much luck making friends–not the real kind, anyway. Moving to a new town is supposed to be a chance to leave behind the problems that plagued Josh at his last school. Problems like Big Brother, Josh’s favorite and best friend. Because, as Josh’s parents tell him, he’s too old to still have imaginary friends. But even before the first day of school is over, Big Brother reappears–and he’s not alone. Only this time one of Josh’s imaginary friends seems to be interacting with another boy at school, Lucas Hernandez. Can Lucas see them, too? Brought together by an unusual classroom experiment and a mysterious invitation to join something called the Gorilla Club, Josh and Lucas are about to discover how a unique way of seeing the world can reveal a real-life friend.

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The Homesick Club
Written by Libby Martinez & illustrated by Rebecca Gibbon
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

Mónica and Hannah are school kids in the big city. Together, they have formed the Homesick Club, since they are both from far away. Mónica misses the family of hummingbirds that she and her grandmother would feed in her backyard in Bolivia every day. Hannah misses the sunshine and the tiny tortoise that lived near her house in Israel.

When a new teacher, Miss Shelby, arrives from Texas, the girls discover that she misses her home, too, especially the huge sky full of stars and a Southern treat known as Hummingbird Cake. The girls ask Miss Shelby to join their club, then Mónica decides she will bring a surprise for show and tell – a surprise that brings Miss Shelby close to tears.

Author Libby Martinez addresses a theme that many children can relate to – feeling homesick – especially when home is far away. Rebecca Gibbon’s charming illustrations bring an imaginative, light touch to the story.

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Little Home Bird
Written & illustrated by Jo Empson
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm
This book is absolutely stunning! The colors and sweet illustrations totally make this book, even though I love the text, too. In this book, little ones will learn about the migration of birds, moving, and that home is where the people you love are, and there are a lot of wonderful places that can feel like home. :)
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

Little Bird loves everything about his home. He’s surrounded by his favourite branch, his favourite food, his favourite view and his favourite music. Why on earth would he ever want to change, even when his brother tells him that they must? Discover how Little Bird ends up finding happiness in his new home from home in this beautifully illustrated picture book. Perfect for all children who love home, however many they may have.

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Bella and Stella Come Home
Written by Anika Denise & illustrated by Christopher Denise
Thoughts from B is for Bookworm
A story about a little girl and her imaginary friend going through a move, this book is fun, imaginative, and relatable! The storyline is great, and I think this book would be especially fun for a child who is moving themselves.
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-5

A little girl tries to reassure her favorite doll when they move to a new, and very different, home.

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Danbi Leads the School Parade
Written & illustrated by Anna Kim
picture book
Recommend Ages: 3-7

Meet Danbi, the new girl at school!

Danbi is thrilled to start her new school in America. But a bit nervous too, for when she walks into the classroom, everything goes quiet. Everyone stares. Danbi wants to join in the dances and the games, but she doesn’t know the rules and just can’t get anything right. Luckily, she isn’t one to give up. With a spark of imagination, she makes up a new game and leads her classmates on a parade to remember! Danbi Leads the School Parade introduces readers to an irresistible new character. In this first story, she learns to navigate her two cultures and realizes that when you open your world to others, their world opens up to you.

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  • Florette - A 2018 New York Times and New York Public Library Best Illustrated Picture Book When Mae’s family moves to a new home, she wishes she could bring her garden with her. She’ll miss the apple trees, the daffodils, and chasing butterflies in the wavy grass. But there’s no room for a garden in the city. Or is there? Mae’s story, gorgeously illustrated in watercolor, is a celebration of friendship, resilience in the face of change, and the magic of the natural world.

  • A Kiss Goodbye - The Goodfather -

    This is a touching story that successfully captures the powerful emotions that can come with moving, even and especially the tender emotions of a child. Anyone going through a move will relate to Chester Raccoon's desire to stay in a familiar place with friends and things he loves. Hopefully Chester's experience will also help bring courage and a positive outlook to anyone struggling.

  • Good-Bye Stacey, Good-Bye (Graphic Novel) - A brand-new Baby-sitters Club graphic novel adapted by Gabriela Epstein!Stacey McGill is moving back to New York! That means no more Stoneybrook Middle School, no more Charlotte Johanssen, and worst of all… no more Baby-sitters Club. Stacey’s friends are crushed when they hear that Stacey’s moving, especially Claudia. Stacey is her best friend.What kind of going-away present is good enough for someone so special? And how will the BSC go on without Stacey?

  • Saving the Team - From star soccer player and Olympic gold medalist Alex Morgan comes the New York Times bestselling first book in an empowering, fun-filled middle grade series about believing in yourself and working as a team. Twelve-year-old Devin loves to play soccer. If she hadn’t just left Connecticut to move across the country, she would have been named seventh-grade captain on her school soccer team. But now that Devin is starting seventh grade in Kentville, California, all bets are off. After all, some of the best players on the US national team come from California. She’s sure to have stiff competition. Or so she thinks. When Devin shows up for tryouts, she discovers that the Kentville Kangaroos–otherwise known as the Kicks–are an absolute mess. Their coach couldn’t care less whether the girls win or lose. And Devin is easily one of the most talented players. The good news is, Devin quickly makes friends with funny, outgoing Jessi; shy but sweet Zoe; and klutzy Emma. Can Devin and her newfound friends pull together and save the team from itself?

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Marshfield Dreams: When I Was a Kid
Written by Ralph Fletcher
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

The colorful boyhood of a popular author comes to life in this personal account Imagine learning from a nosy classmate that your mother is having yet another baby. To Ralph’s classmates, news of one more Fletcher baby is just “scuttlebutt.” But for Ralph, the oldest of nine, being part of a large family means more kids to join in the fun–from making tripods in the woods and “snicking” up the rug to raising chicks and even discovering a meteor (well, maybe). It doesn’t feel like there’s life beyond Marshfield, Massachusetts. Then one day Dad’s new job moves the family to Chicago, and there’s so much Ralph has to leave behind. In this humorous and captivating memoir, Ralph Fletcher traces the roots of his storytelling.

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Finding Langston
Written & illustrated by Lesa Cline-Ransome
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year, with 5 Starred Reviews, and a School Library Journal Best Book of 2018 When eleven-year-old Langston’s father moves them from their home in Alabama to Chicago’s Bronzeville district, it feels like he’s giving up everything he loves. It’s 1946. Langston’s mother has just died, and now they’re leaving the rest of his family and friends. He misses everything– Grandma’s Sunday suppers, the red dirt roads, and the magnolia trees his mother loved. In the city, they live in a small apartment surrounded by noise and chaos. It doesn’t feel like a new start, or a better life. At home he’s lonely, his father always busy at work; at school he’s bullied for being a country boy. But Langston’s new home has one fantastic thing. Unlike the whites-only library in Alabama, the Chicago Public Library welcomes everyone. There, hiding out after school, Langston discovers another Langston–a poet whom he learns inspired his mother enough to name her only son after him. Lesa Cline-Ransome, author of the Coretta Scott King Honor picture book Before She Was Harriet, has crafted a lyrical debut novel about one boy’s experiences during the Great Migration. Includes an author’s note about the historical context and her research. Winner of the 2019 Scott O’Dell Award for Historical Fiction A Junior Library Guild selection!

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My Fox Ate My Homework
Written & illustrated by David Blaze
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

My name is Jonah Johnson, and I’m in the 6th grade - but please call me Joe. My whole world just got turned upside down. It’s my first day at a new school and I’ve already got to deal with the bully. If that wasn’t bad enough, there’s a talking fox that keeps getting me into trouble at my new house in the country. I know it sounds crazy, but it’s true! To top it all off, I’ve got to help save my mom’s house!

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Jamie Is Jamie
Written by Afsaneh Moradian & illustrated by Maria Bogade
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

When free-spirited Jamie arrives at a new preschool, all the children learn that gender expression doesn’t determine which toys to play with. There are so many fun things to play with at Jamie’s new preschool–baby dolls to care for, toy cars to drive–and Jamie wants to play with them all! But the other children are confused by Jamie’s gender expression . . . is Jamie a boy or a girl? Some toys are just for girls and others are just for boys, aren’t they? Not according to Jamie! Join Jamie’s new friends as they learn the importance of cooperation, creativity, and empathy. Jamie Is Jamie is a great way to start a conversation with children about gender expression by: challenging gender stereotypesshowing readers that playing is fundamental to learningreinforcing the idea that all children need the freedom to play unencumbered A special section for teachers, parents, and caregivers provides tips on how to make children’s playtime learning time. Don’t miss out on more of Jamie’s adventures in Jamie and Bubbie, available now! The Jamie Is Jamie Series The Jamie Is Jamie series invites young children to join Jamie as they build confidence through imaginative free play, break down gender stereotypes, respect pronouns and gender identity, and learn self-advocacy skills. Each book includes a section for adults to help them reinforce the books’ messages.

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All of Me
Written by Chris Baron
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Ari has body-image issues. After a move across the country, his parents work selling and promoting his mother’s paintings and sculptures. Ari’s bohemian mother needs space to create, and his father is gone for long stretches of time on “sales” trips. Meanwhile, Ari makes new friends: Pick, the gamer; the artsy Jorge, and the troubled Lisa. He is also relentlessly bullied because he’s overweight, but he can’t tell his parents—they’re simply not around enough to listen. After an upsetting incident, Ari’s mom suggests he go on a diet, and she gives him a book to help. But the book—and the diet—can’t fix everything. As Ari faces the demise of his parents’ marriage, he also feels himself changing, both emotionally and physically. Here is a much-needed story about accepting the imperfect in oneself and in life.

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  • The Last Great Adventure of the PB & J Society - When her best friend’s house is threatened with foreclosure, young Annie Jenkins is full of ideas to save the home: selling her appendix on eBay, winning the lottery, facing down the bankers . . . anything to keep Jason from moving. But Jason’s out-of-work dad blows up at the smallest things, and he’s not very happy with Annie’s interventions, which always seem to get them into more trouble. But when Annie tracks a lost treasure to Jason’s backyard, she’s sure the booty will be enough to save Jason’s family. Pirate treasure in the Midwest seems far-fetched, even to Annie, but it could be the answer to all their problems. Now all she has to do is convince Jason. As the two hunt for answers and the pressure gets to Jason and his family, Annie discovers that the best-laid plans aren’t always enough and there are worse things than moving away.

  • The Chance to Fly - A heartfelt middle-grade novel about a theater-loving girl who uses a wheelchair for mobility and her quest to defy expectations–and gravity–from Tony award-winning actress Ali Stroker and Stacy Davidowitz Thirteen-year-old Nat Beacon loves a lot of things: her dog Warbucks, her best friend Chloe, and competing on her wheelchair racing team, the Zoomers, to name a few. But there’s one thing she’s absolutely OBSESSED with: MUSICALS! From Hamilton to Les Mis, there’s not a cast album she hasn’t memorized and belted along to. She’s never actually been in a musical though, or even seen an actor who uses a wheelchair for mobility on stage. Would someone like Nat ever get cast? But when Nat’s family moves from California to New Jersey, Nat stumbles upon auditions for a kids’ production of Wicked, one of her favorite musicals ever! And she gets into the ensemble! The other cast members are super cool and inclusive (well, most of them)– especially Malik, the male lead and cutest boy Nat’s ever seen. But when things go awry a week before opening night, will Nat be able to cast her fears and insecurities aside and “Defy Gravity” in every sense of the song title?

  • Gibberish - It’s Dat’s first day of school in a new country! Dat and his Mah made a long journey to get here, and Dat doesn’t know the language. To Dat, everything everybody says - from the school bus driver to his new classmates - sounds like gibberish. How is Dat going to make new friends if they can’t understand each other? Luckily there’s a friendly girl in Dat’s class who knows that there are other ways to communicate, besides just talking. Could she help make sense of the gibberish?

  • Lily and Dunkin - “Gephart has written a story that will speak not just to one specific community, but to humanity as a whole.” –VOYA For readers who enjoyed Wonder and Counting by 7’s, award-winning author Donna Gephart crafts a compelling dual narrative about two remarkable young people: Lily, a transgender girl, and Dunkin, a boy dealing with bipolar disorder. Their powerful story will shred your heart, then stitch it back together with kindness, humor, bravery, and love.Lily Jo McGrother, born Timothy McGrother, is a girl. But being a girl is not so easy when you look like a boy. Especially when you’re in the eighth grade. Dunkin Dorfman, birth name Norbert Dorfman, is dealing with bipolar disorder and has just moved from the New Jersey town he’s called home for the past thirteen years. This would be hard enough, but the fact that he is also hiding from a painful secret makes it even worse. One summer morning, Lily Jo McGrother meets Dunkin Dorfman, and their lives forever change. 2017 Southern Book Award Winner–Juvenile Category Voice Award from the Palm Beach County Action Alliance for Mental Health NPR’s Best Kids’ Books of 2016 Chicago Public Library Best Fiction for Older Readers 2016 New York Public Library Best Books for Kids 2016 Amazon’s Top 20 Children’s Books of 2016 Top 10 Audiobooks of 2016, School Library Journal YALSA 2017 Best Fiction for Young Adults YALSA 2017 Quick Picks for Reluctant Young Adult Readers ALA 2017 Rainbow Book List – GLBTQ Books for Children & Teens Georgia Book Award, 2017-2018 Nominee Rhode Island Middle School Book Award Nominee, 2018 Wisconsin State Reading Association’s Just One More Page Selection, 2017 Indie Next Pick Summer 2016 Junior Library Guild Selection Goodreads Choice Awards 2016 – Best Middle Grade & Children’s 2016 Nerdy Book Club Award 2016 Rainbow Awards – Best Transgender Book * 2016 Spring Okra Pick – the Best in Southern Literature “Gephart clearly has a lot of heart, and she tells their stories with compassion.”–Kirkus “A thoughtfully and sensitively written work of character-driven fiction that dramatically addresses two important subjects that deserve more widespread attention.”–Booklist, starred “Gephart sympathetically contrasts the physical awkwardness, uncertainty, and longings of these two outsiders during a few tightly-plotted months, building to a crescendo of revelation…[A] valuable portrait of two teenagers whose journeys are just beginning.”–PW “This would be a fantastic addition to any middle grade library collection, and is highly recommended for all ages.”–VOYA “Lily and Dunkin is a delight. Here’s a book for anyone who’s ever struggled with being different–or anyone who’s ever loved someone who bears the burden of difference. . . . Crucial, heart-breaking, and inspiring.” –Jennifer Finney Boylan, author of She’s Not There and Stuck in the Middle with You

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The Many Meanings of Meilan
Written by Andrea Wang
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 9-12

“The little girl I was would have been thrilled to encounter Meilan… having found a character who embraces the complexity of being both Chinese and American, I would have been able to echo her words: ‘I am not alone.’” –New York Times Book Review by Jean Kwok A family feud before the start of seventh grade propels Meilan from Boston’s Chinatown to rural Ohio, where she must tap into her inner strength and sense of justice to make a new place for herself in this resonant debut. Meilan Hua’s world is made up of a few key ingredients: her family’s beloved matriarch, Nai Nai; the bakery her parents, aunts, and uncles own and run in Boston’s Chinatown; and her favorite Chinese fairy tales. After Nai Nai passes, the family has a falling-out that sends Meilan, her parents, and her grieving grandfather on the road in search of a new home. They take a winding path across the country before landing in Redbud, Ohio. Everything in Redbud is the opposite of Chinatown, and Meilan’s not quite sure who she is–being renamed at school only makes it worse. She decides she is many Meilans, each inspired by a different Chinese character with the same pronunciation as her name. Sometimes she is Mist, cooling and invisible; other times, she’s Basket, carrying her parents’ hopes and dreams and her guilt of not living up to them; and occasionally she is bright Blue, the way she feels around her new friend Logan. Meilan keeps her facets separate until an injustice at school shows her the power of bringing her many selves together. The Many Meanings of Meilan, written in stunning prose by Andrea Wang, is an exploration of all the things it’s possible to grieve, the injustices large and small that make us rage, and the peace that’s unlocked when we learn to find home within ourselves.

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Amara and the Bats
Written & illustrated by Emma Reynolds
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Environmental activism gets a nocturnal twist in this utterly charming picture book about a young girl and her mission to save the bats! Amara loves bats! Her favorite thing to do is to collect bat facts and watch the amazing mammals fly at night by her house. But when Amara moves to a new town, she learns that her beloved bats no longer roost nearby because so many trees are being cut down. Amara is upset. What can she do to help? She’s just one person, and the problem feels so much bigger than her. But after doing some research, she discovers that there are many young people making big changes all around the world. Inspired to take action, Amara gathers her new friends to help save the bats. Together, she knows they can make a difference! Emma Reynolds crafts an inspiring story about community action, perseverance, and what to do in the face of climate anxiety. At its heart, this is a story about hope and finding a place to call home.

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Katie Cupcakes and Wedding Bells
Written by Coco Simon
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Katie is unpleasantly surprised to find out her family is moving into a new house after her mom’s wedding in the latest addition to the Cupcake Diaries series. Katie’s mom is getting married! Katie and her three best friends couldn’t be happier and have so much fun pitching in with getting ready for the big day–especially with cake testing! But when Katie finds out her mom’s marriage means her family has to move, suddenly the wedding isn’t as joyous an occasion. What will life be like in a new home with a new family?

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Holes in the Sky
Written & illustrated by Patricia Polacco
picture book
Recommend Ages: 6-9

Miss Eula is back! In this heartwarming companion to Chicken Sunday, young Trisha is devastated when her grandmother passes away, but finds joy in bonds with a new friend, her new California neighborhood–and the invincible Miss Eula. There will never be anyone like her grandmother, Patricia Polacco thinks, when her grandmother passes away. But when she and her family move to California–in the middle of a drought–she meets a new friend, the irrepressible Stewart, and his amazing grandmother, Miss Eula, who not only takes Trisha under her wing, but, with Trisha and Stewart, steps up to lead their entire extraordinarily diverse neighborhood to help a hurting neighbor–and her once lush garden–survive the drought. Trisha’s grandmother’s old saying about the stars being Holes in the Sky turns out to be Miss Eula’s, too, convincing Trisha that she has miraculously discovered another unforgettable grandmother.

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A House for Hermit Crab
Written & illustrated by Eric Carle
Thoughts from Mr. Staccato
Hermit crab is growing and that means he must find a new shell. The shell he finds is quite plain, but during the course of a year, he invites many new sea friends to accompany him. Some add interesting colors to his shell, while others help protect him. A nice book from Eric Carle about adjusting to new situations and making the most of them.
board book
Recommend Ages: 5-8

Join Hermit Crab as he learns an important lesson about growing up: For every friend and adventure left behind, there are new ones just ahead!

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  • For Black Girls Like Me - I am a girl but most days I feel like a question mark. Makeda June Kirkland is eleven-years-old, adopted, and black. Her parents and big sister are white, and even though she loves her family very much, Makeda often feels left out. When Makeda’s family moves from Maryland to New Mexico, she leaves behind her best friend, Lena- the only other adopted black girl she knows- for a new life. In New Mexico, everything is different. At home, Makeda’s sister is too cool to hang out with her anymore and at school, she can’t seem to find one true friend. Through it all, Makeda can’t help wondering: What would it feel like to grow up with a family that looks like me? Through singing, dreaming, and writing secret messages back and forth with Lena, Makeda might just carve a small place for herself in the world.

  • A Royal Tea - When Shelly meets the Queen of the Western Oceans in this Mermaid Tales adventure, she encounters a royal dilemma! When a royal messenger announces that Queen Edwina is coming to tea, Shelly is as jittery as a jellyfish! After all, the Queen of the Western Oceans is her great aunt. And despite being a princess, Shelly has never met a queen before. How should she act? What should she wear? Then Pearl tells Shelly that the queen is going to take Shelly to live in Neptune’s Castle: “It’s where a real princess would live,” Pearl tells her. Shelly is terrified of leaving her home, friends, and beloved grandfather behind. When the royal carriage arrives, she’s trembling from the top of her head to the tip of her tail. What will Queen Edwina think of Princess Shelly? And will she really take Shelly away from the home she loves?

  • New Kid - New York Times bestselling author and former NFL defensive end Tim Green delivers another baseball tale that will keep kids on the edge of their seats. Perfect for fans of Mike Lupica or Dan Gutman’s Baseball Card Adventure series. Tommy’s the new kid in town, like he’s been so many times before. Now he goes by the name Brock, and he’s having a hard time fitting in, especially when his new friend is the bully from the wrong side of the tracks. Thanks to a prank gone wrong, the baseball coach notices Brock and offers him a place on his failing baseball team. But can Brock prove himself on and off the field before he becomes a new kid…again?

  • A Horse for Kate - When Kate’s family moves, she leaves behind her friends and the riding lessons she loves, but when she meets Tori and they find a mysterious thoroughbred, her new life might just mean her biggest dream comes true. Simultaneous eBook.

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Quintessence
Written by Jess Redman
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-12

Quintessence is an extraordinary story from Jess Redman about friendship, self-discovery, interconnectedness, and the inexplicable elements that make you you. Find the Elements. Grow the Light. Save the Starling. Three months ago, twelve-year-old Alma moved to the town of Four Points. Her panic attacks started a week later, and they haven’t stopped–even though she’s told her parents that they have. She’s homesick and friendless and every day she feels less and less like herself. But one day she finds a telescope in the town’s junk shop, and through its lens, she watches a star–a star that looks like a child–fall from the sky and into her backyard. Alma knows what it’s like to be lost and afraid, to long for home, and she knows that it’s up to her to save the star. And so, with the help of some unlikely new friends from Astronomy Club, she sets out on a quest that will take a little bit of science, a little bit of magic, and her whole self. This title has Common Core connections.

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Sunday Rain
Written by Rosie J. Pova & illustrated by Amariah Rauscher
picture book
Recommend Ages: 4-8

Elliott has just moved into a new house. He spends his days with his fictional friends, immersed in a book. When an inviting Sunday rain gathers the local kids to play in the puddles, Elliott longs to join in, but he’s too shy to go outside. Soon, Elliott discovers that new friendships are like a new book–you just have to plunge into the adventure.

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Quinny & Hopper
Written by Adriana Brad Schanen & illustrated by Greg Swearingen
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 8-11

Quinny has a lot to say. Hopper gets to the point.

Quinny has one speed: very, very, extra-very fast. Hopper proceeds with caution.

Quinny has big ideas. Hopper has smart solutions.

Quinny and Hopper couldn’t be more different. They are an unstoppable team.

But when summer ends, things suddenly aren’t the same. Can Quinny and Hopper stick together in the face of stylish bullies, a killer chicken, and the brand-new Third Grade Rules-especially the one that says they aren’t allowed to be friends anymore?

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Pixie Pushes On
chapter book
Recommend Ages: 10-14

A young girl learns bittersweet life lessons on the family farm after her sister gets polio, in this poignant and funny novel set in the heartland in the 1940s. Pixie’s defenses are up, and it’s no wonder. She’s been uprooted, the chickens seem to have it in for her, and now her beloved sister, Charlotte, has been stricken with polio and whisked away into quarantine. So it’s not surprising Pixie lashes out. But her habit of making snap judgements–and giving her classmates nicknames like “Rotten Ricky” and “Big-Mouth Berta”–hasn’t won her any friends. At least life on the farm is getting better with the delivery of its newest resident–a runt baby lamb. Raising Buster takes patience and understanding–and this slowing down helps Pixie put things in better perspective. So too does paying attention to her neighbors, and finding that with the war on she’s not the only one missing someone. As Pixie pushes past her own pain to become a bigger person, she’s finally able to make friends; and to laugh about the fact that it is in places where she least expected it. “Pixie is full of heart! A laugh-out-loud book that also wades into poignant life lessons. A must read!”–Lynda Mullaly Hunt, author of Fish in a Tree “Pixie has bad luck–and is bad luck if you ask her. But she also has grit and gumption, so when her bad luck doesn’t let go, she opens her eyes and her heart wider. Her world changes when she changes how she looks at her world. I loved Pixie and her story–a story filled with humor, hope, and everyday heroes.”–Lynn Plourde, author of Maxi’s Secrets

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